FlatRock The Hill

thehill

FlatRock
The Hill

The Hill by Indie Pop Outfit FlatRock, offers soft and calming vocals which are equally blended with serene keys yet embedded with enough flash/flare within the keys and guitars to create Flatrock’s Pop/Rock sound.

Melissa leads the way for Flatrock with the vocals and keys throughout the album. I found the keys more or less plays two roles throughout the album as they can be heard as the lead instrument or used within the rhythm course. The guitars also play a similar role throughout the album either playing lead or laying down the rhythm. Also the guitars also have a few crucial leads and solos in a couple particular songs including my favourite “Spring”.

Flatrock’s sound is definitely a distinctive one to say the least. Trying to narrow it down to a specific sound or genre other than just creating a Pop/Rock bubble around it. They use the guitars in a few different fashions throughout the album. To create a unique and almost an eighties and you could even argue a 70’s feel (“River Run”) to the album they use the guitars to create a background Synth, backing noise. The synthesizer addition to the tracks also help give the guitars a more filling sound.

My favourite track off of the album is “Spring”. When I first listened to the track I really didn’t expect the song to evolve like it does comparing to the intro. The darkened vocals in the beginning of the track definitely leads you to believe other wise. The song writing in the track is quite clever during the first minute as Flatrock slowly builds up the song. I liked how the rolling of the drums expresses themselves in the background of the song. But It is the lead guitar hook that caught my ears the first time I heard it play. The riff definitely stands out in the song and for me on the album as well. Really throughout the song the guitars adds such a distinct sound to the song. Even in the bridge work the solo work stands outside of the song. I would have liked to hear the main guitar riff last and play longer than it does.